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Drug and Alcohol Addictions

It’s estimated that more than 23 million Americans suffer from substance use disorders, but only 10% of them seek treatment. Landmark Recovery is working to remove societal barriers to addiction treatment in an effort to save lives. Addiction has become a serious public health crisis, with impacts extending beyond the people abusing drugs or alcohol. Drug overdose cases continue to rise. We offer personalized programs to help people find sustained recovery from substance use.

A look at Drug Use in the United States

9% of adults use marijuana

3% of adults use heroin

7% of adults use opioids

2% of adults use cocaine

7% of adults use methamphetamine

Understanding Addiction

There’s an old and flawed belief that people with an addiction to drugs or alcohol lack the willpower to quit. The reality is that addiction occurs in an area of the brain called the mesolimbic dopamine system, which is not consciously controlled. When a person has a substance use disorder their brains become dependent on the drug. Addiction causes changes in brain activity that can impair reasoning, causing them to prioritize getting high over their own health and safety. Many people with an addiction may not realize they have a problem. Those in the grips of addiction often experience uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms if they try to stop using a substance.

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Drug and Alcohol Stats

More than 15 million Americans have an alcohol use disorder.

More than 32 million Americans use illegal drugs.

22% of males and 17% of females used illegal drugs or misused prescription drugs in the last year.

Drug use is highest among people between the ages of 18 and 25.

8% of people with an alcohol addiction receive treatment.

What does Addiction Look Like?

Recognizing a substance use disorder can be difficult. Many people hide their addiction to drugs or alcohol, making it hard for co-workers, friends and even family members to tell whether they have a problem.

There is no one face of addiction. Substance use disorders don’t discriminate. We see people from all economic and social backgrounds struggling to break free from chemical dependency. What they all have in common is the inability to stop using a substance.

Diagnosing an addiction takes skill and is best done by a medical professional. At Landmark Recovery, we utilize the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which defines the criteria of addiction. An addiction is a primary, chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory and related circuitry. Substance use disorder is characterized by an inability to consistently abstain from using a drug or drinking alcohol. People with addictions develop an impairment in behavioral control. They are overcome by cravings and prioritize getting high or drunk over interpersonal relationships, work and other activities. As with other chronic diseases, addiction often involves cycles of relapse and remission. Without treatment or engagement in recovery activities, addiction can become disabling and lead to death.

Signs of Addiction

Drug and alcohol addictions are not always easy to diagnose. Symptoms and behaviors of substance abuse may include:

  • Craving – Feeling that you need drugs or alcohol
  • Intense Urges – that eclipse other thoughts and priorities
  • Increased Usage – Needing more the substance to achieve a desired high
  • Risky Behaviors – doing unsafe or unethical things when you’re under the influence
  • Loss of Relationships – Prioritizing drugs of drinking over spending time with family and friends
  • Withdrawal Symptoms – experiencing uncomfortable and often painful symptoms when use of a drug is stopped
  • Financial Loss – spending money on substances even though you can’t afford it
  • Failed Recovery – If you’ve tried to stop using but can’t

Myths and Misconceptions about Substance Use

People with a substance use disorder (SUD) are bad, or criminals.

Negative stereotypes have led many of us to view people with a drug or alcohol addiction as having a character flaw, or prone to criminal behavior. That’s simply not true. People from all walks of life experience SUDs, and most are not committing criminal acts.

A person’s potential for addiction is affected by several factors, including: genetics, environment, development, personality and psychology. While substance use starts as a choice, addiction is not. The brain and body become dependent on a substance, making it extremely difficult to stop using.

Unless someone is motivated to change and chooses to enter a treatment program they will not have a successful recovery.

This is not true. Research shows that even people who are forced into treatment can, and often do, recover. Outcomes for people who are legally mandated to enter a drug or alcohol rehab program are similar to those who seek out treatment voluntarily, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Substance abusers must hit “rock bottom” before they can change.

While many people who enter addiction treatment have reached a low point in their lives, there is no evidence to support that hitting “rock bottom” is necessary for a successful recovery. In fact, research shows the earlier someone seeks addiction treatment, the longer they can live a healthy life in recovery.

Addicts can’t be treated with medications.

New medicines such as suboxone and naloxone are clinically proven to reduce cravings for drugs and reduce the chances of relapse.

Some people just can’t change.

Research shows that the more attempts someone makes to stop abusing drugs or alcohol the more likely they are to succeed. With each attempt to change a behavior, they learn more about themselves and gain confidence while understanding what strategies work for them.

If you can go to work you’re not really addicted.

This myth is perpetuated by people struggling with addiction rather than outside observers. It’s a cause of denial, which plays a strong role in keeping people from getting the treatment they need. Going to work does not mean someone has control over an addiction. Many people with substance use disorders hold jobs, and may appear to be “high functioning.” But over time they will lose control as the addiction progresses.

People in recovery are boring.

Many people dealing with an addiction feel like they won’t have a fun or interesting life without using a substance. Nothing could be further from the truth. This statement is just another part of denial. Recovery can open new opportunities, provide confidence and help people achieve their goals.

Effective Addiction Treatment

Landmark Recovery offers evidence-based treatment programs to help break the cycle of addiction. Our staff works with each individual to develop cognitive behavioral therapy plans that focus on the root causes of substance abuse. There are many treatment options available, but choosing the best option for you can be a challenge. We recommend talking to an addiction specialist to get a full understanding of each treatment path and what may be best for you.

Medical Detox

Typically the first step in recovery, you’ll detox under the supervision of medical professionals. We’ll monitor how your body responds as drugs and alcohol naturally leave your body.

More about Medical Detox

Residential Treatment

You’ll stay in our rehab center between 30 and 45 days, depending on your level of addiction and the substance(s) you’re using. This lets you focus on getting better and developing skills to live a healthier life.

More about Inpatient Rehab

Outpatient Treatment

Most patients begin outpatient treatment after completing our residential program. You’ll live at home, but come to our center for therapy and support groups.

More about Outpatient Treatment

Partial Hospitalization

This treatment program offers flexibility while providing the care and support you need to make a full recovery. It works best for those with are able to reintegrate into their community.

More about Partial Hospitalization

Medication-Assisted Treatment (Suboxone Clinic)

This outpatient program helps those dealing with opioid addictions live a healthier life. It combines medication assisted treatment with behavioral therapy.

More about MAT

Medical Detox

Typically the first step in recovery, you’ll detox under the supervision of medical professionals. We’ll monitor how your body responds as drugs and alcohol naturally leave your body.

More about Medical Detox

Residential Treatment

You’ll stay in our rehab center between 30 and 45 days, depending on your level of addiction and the substance(s) you’re using. This lets you focus on getting better and developing skills to live a healthier life.

More about Inpatient Rehab

Outpatient Treatment

Most patients begin outpatient treatment after completing our residential program. You’ll live at home, but come to our center for therapy and support groups.

More about Outpatient Treatment

Partial Hospitalization

This treatment program offers flexibility while providing the care and support you need to make a full recovery. It works best for those with are able to reintegrate into their community.

More about Partial Hospitalization

Medication-Assisted Treatment (Suboxone Clinic)

This outpatient program helps those dealing with opioid addictions live a healthier life. It combines medication assisted treatment with behavioral therapy.

More about MAT

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(888) 448-0302