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Darvon

Sounds Like: DAR.von

Classification: Opioid Analgesic

Controlled Substance Act Schedule: IV

Other names for Darvon

  • Darvocet (when combined with acetaminophen)
  • Pinks
  • Footballs
  • 65s
  • Ns

Darvon Addiction

In 2010, Darvon (propoxyphene) was banned in the US due to severe cardiotoxicity effects in those taking it. Tramadol is recommended as the replacement for the drug. Codeine was also regarded as a better alternative for Darvon. Darvon is a very weak opioid drug; it isn’t considered a drug that has the full strength of a regular opioid, meaning it has been used to help with opioid withdrawals as a way to help someone taper if needed.

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Intended Use of Darvon

Darvon was used as a short-term opioid analgesic drug for those who didn’t need a full opioid prescription. Its usefulness was derived from the fact that it was stronger than aspirin and weaker than a full opioid agonist.

How Darvon Is Taken

The drug was used to commit suicide and abused in pill form by non-medical users for some time before the drug was banned in the US for side effects and risks that outweighed the benefits. Before its ban, Darvon was used to treat diarrhea and pain issues in patients as a low-power opioid, since opioid drugs have the ability to cause firm stools or constipation in users. Patients would receive a pill capsule with the drug, and some formulations with acetaminophen were made, called Darvocet.

Side Effects of
Darvon

Darvon has been linked to cardiovascular issues in those that have been prescribed it, which has led to a ban on the drug in the US. The drug was also used to commit suicide for many of those prescribed the drug. Side effects included:

  • Lightheadedness
  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Sleepiness
  • Constipation
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Stomach pain
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Blurred vision
  • Skin rash

Signs of an
Addiction to Darvon

Those who find themselves compulsively redosing Darvon after using it may be suffering from Darvon dependence and should seek help in case this develops into non-medical use of stronger opioid drugs. Depression, requesting more of the drug, and seeking alternative ways to get pills were all signs that someone might have been addicted to Darvon. Darvon withdrawal is much like a milder version of regular opioid withdrawal. Symptoms of Darvon withdrawal may include:

Cravings

Fatigue

Nausea

Diarrhea

Vomiting

Insomnia

Mild tremors

Decreased appetite

Darvon
Abuse Facts

Darvon was banned in the US in 2010. This was due to the possibility of fatal arrhythmias in patients prescribed Darvon/Darvocet.

Darvon acted as a kind of gateway into stronger opioids for those who abused the pills.